HEADLINES / TRENDS l STATS l RESEARCH l MEDIA l PEOPLE

January 2012

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Alternative Healthcare Options

If one of your New Year’s resolutions is to improve your well-being, you might want to look at healthcare choices beyond those offered by conventional medicine. Here are some groups that may help you find the practitioner you’re looking for.

Organization Their Approach to Health Contact Information
American
Academy of Environmental
Medicine (AAEM)
MDs and other healthcare professionals focus on how the environment affects health, including the additive effects (“total load”) of exposure to various toxins www.aaemonline.org
316-684-5500
American Association
of Naturopathic
Physicians (AANP)
Naturopathic physicians (NDs) “help facilitate the body’s inherent ability to restore and maintain optimal health,” in the words of the AANP website, through means that include nutrition, lifestyle changes, and herbs and supplements www.naturopathic.org
866-538-2267
American Association
of Acupuncture and
Oriental Medicine
(AAAOM)
Acupuncturists (registered or licensed) and
doctors of Oriental Medicine (OMDs and other
titles) use acupuncture, Chinese herbalism and
other therapies to help the body attain and
maintain proper energy balance
www.aaaomonline.org
866-455-7999
American Herbalists
Guild (AHG)
Registered herbalists use plant-based remedies (either whole herbs or extracts) to promote health and well-being www.american
herbalistsguild.com

857-350-3128
American Massage
Therapy Association
(AMTA)
Trained therapists (titles vary by location and degree awarded) use various types of massage to help relieve pain and ease stress, and for general well-being www.amtamassage.org
877-905-0577
American Osteopathic
Association (AOA)
Doctors of osteopathic medicine (DOs) combine conventional and alternative treatments, including manipulation of the muscles and joints, to treat illness www.osteopathic.org
800-621-1773
National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy
(NAHA)
Registered Aromatherapists (RAs) and other licensed professionals use aromatic plant essences to promote physical and emotional well-being www.naha.org
828-898-6161
National Center for Homeopathy (NCH) Certified or registered homeopaths (CCH or RSHom(NA)) employ remedies based on the idea that substances which cause symptoms in healthy people can, if taken in tiny amounts, help alleviate those symptoms; for example, taking a fever-causing substance to alleviate fever www.nationalcenter
forhomeopathy.org

703-548-7790

 

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Ubiquinol Aids Oral Health

Ubiquinol, a form of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) more readily usable by the body, may help you hang onto your pearly whites by supporting a tooth-friendly environment within the mouth.

Researchers at the Nihon School of Dentistry in Japan gave either ubiquinol or a placebo to 45 people with mild to moderate periodontal disease, an inflammation of the gums that can lead to tooth loss.

After two months, members of the supplement group experienced a reduction in gum bleeding, a key sign of periodontal problems, and had less plaque adhering to their teeth.

Study results were presented to the Vitamin Society of Japan.

In another Japanese investigation, scientists gave either ubiquinol, CoQ10 or a placebo to two groups of volunteers, those with healthy mouths and those with dry mouth (a condition that can
lead to periodontal disease). Both CoQ10 and ubiquinol improved saliva production by between 70% and 80% in the dry-mouth group; no such increase was seen in the control participants. Results were published in Clinical Biochemistry.

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Laughter Calms
Alzheimer’s Patients

People with Alzheimer’s often become extremely agitated, making a difficult situation even more problematic for patients and caregivers alike. But a recent study indicates that giving Alzheimer’s patients a reason to laugh may tone down verbally and physically aggressive behavior.

A team of Australian researchers enrolled nearly 400 nursing home residents with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia in a three-month study. The residents attended weekly
sessions involving mime, music and laugh-inducing props, and were actively encouraged to respond and participate in the fun.

Overall agitation dropped 20% and this improvement held steady for at least 14 weeks after the program ended, according to study results presented at the National Dementia Research Forum in Sydney.

“The humor intervention worked well for pretty much everyone,” says study co-author Jean-Paul Bell, creative director of the Arts Health Institute in New South Wales. He notes that humor doesn’t carry the serious side effects of antipsychotic drugs used to ease agitation.

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RESOURCE

Lustgarten Foundation

What It Is: An organization that promotes awareness of, and supports research
into the causes and possible treatments for, pancreatic cancer

Contact: www.lustgarten.org
866-789-1000

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NUMBERS

Baby Boomer Health Struggles

66
Age of the oldest Boomers
(people born between 1946 and 1964)

56%
Those who say they are not
in good overall health

6 to 8
Number of daily medications taken by the average person age 55 or older

Source: A Fragile Nation in Poor Health, TeleVox

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