HEADLINES / TRENDS l STATS l RESEARCH l MEDIA l PEOPLE

June 2016

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MEDIA

Losing Weight by

Managing Metabolism

 


Weight loss is more complex than “eat less, exercise more.” Our bodies are designed to hang onto every pound, an unhelpful habit in a society overrun with excess calories.

Two recently published weight loss books address aspects of metabolism, a term that covers everything living cells must do to maintain themselves—including production of calorie-burning energy.

In Accidentally Overweight (Hay House), nutritional biochemist Libby Weaver, PhD, tackles factors that affect metabolism, such as thyroid function, stress hormones and insulin usage.

“We are not wired to cope with constant pressure, perceived or real, nor are we equipped long-term to eat poor food and lead sedentary lifestyles,” says Weaver. Accidentally Overweight helps the reader discover how these concerns, among others, retard weight reduction, and the best ways to counteract them.

Insulin is the star of The Thinsulin Program (Da Capo). The writing team, led by weight loss expert Charles Nguyen, MD, explains how high insulin levels disrupt fat loss. The key to controlling insulin, they say, is to cut carbs, particularly the ones that dramatically increase blood sugar, while increasing protein and fiber intake. Nguyen and his coauthors say their two-phase Thinsulin Program is “grounded in research and clinical experience,” a claim the book supports with dozens of patient profiles.

 

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RESOURCE


Scanning for Sugar

 

If you’re looking to lose weight, one way is to avoid sugar. The sweet stuff is sour news; consuming too much has been linked to obesity, type 2 diabetes, cognitive dysfunction and cancer.

It isn’t always easy to find added sweetness in packaged foods, though, given that there are dozens of ways to say “sugar” on food labels. One way to uncover these hidden sources is to download a free phone app called SugarChecked. Created by a team of nutritionists, this app lets you quickly scan product barcodes for sugar content. It recognizes everything that falls under the four main types of sugars—added sugars, artificial sweeteners, natural low-calorie sweeteners and sugar alcohols—and receives recommendations for healthier alternatives in real time as you shop.

SugarChecked is available through the App Store or for Android phones via Google Play; learn more at contentchecked.com.sugar.

 

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Weight Loss Linked

To Better Diabetic Brain Health

 

Diabetes can compromise brain health, but losing weight may slow this process.

Researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine followed two groups of people with type 2 diabetes for more than 10 years. The 164 volunteers in the first group received intensive diet and exercise counseling designed to help them lose at least 7% of their body weight. The 155 people in the other group participated in a standard diabetes education program.

As noted in the journal Diabetes Care, those in the second group lost less weight and were less fit. Their brains also had less gray matter and more white matter disease, changes linked to cognitive decline.

 

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CHAMPIONS OF INDUSTRY

Why Health Executives

Love Their Work


"I had been in sales for 11 years before a health food industry opportunity allowed me to find my calling. Since then, for the past 23 years, I have invested in our health food industry by helping health food retailers be successful in providing natural and safe products to their customers. I have been paid back in dividends by working with the most ethical, happy, fun and yes, healthiest family of lifelong friends one could ever wish for. I am motivated every day to see what new challenges can be solved by and with, the good people in our health food industry!"

—Pat Hessler, Director of Sales, Bluebonnet Nutrition

 

"Twenty-six years ago, my wife became very ill and was virtually bedridden. After many medical visits we found a doctor who had practiced in Europe and had prescribed herbal products for many years. Within two weeks of following his advice and utilizing natural products, my wife was out of bed, and very soon became fully functional again. This was my first testament of the efficacy of natural products for good health. Today, I am most passionate about the rights of individuals to make healthcare choices for themselves. This freedom of choice is fundamental to our industry. Allowing each person to choose a medical practitioner or health advisor, and to choose supplements as part of a health regimen, should be every person’s right. We must continue to be vigilant in protecting these rights."

—Bruce R. Hough, President, Nutraceutical Corporation

 

"I am the CEO of Natural Organics, a big, beautiful supplement company with hundreds of loving, fantastic people that form a family of love and integrity. To work in the vitamin industry is to care about the health of others, to help them live better—work better, play better, be better. Vitamins are a part of that and I am thrilled to devote time to such a worthy endeavor."

—Meadow Williams, Chief Executive, Natural Organics


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Going to the Dogs Helps Seniors

Stay Healthier and

Slimmer Healthy

 


For many older people, a dog provides a companion who is always ready for an outdoor excursion. Now it appears that those trips outside may decrease a senior’s body mass while increasing his or her well-being.

A study team at the University of Missouri set out to see how the bonds between seniors and their dogs affected walking behavior. The team took its data from the ongoing Health and Retirement Study, which targets adults age 50 and older. The analysis included information on 771 people, of whom 271 had one or more dogs.

In addition to ascertaining the participants’ body mass index (BMI) figures—an estimation of body fat—the research team also examined the participants’ answers to questions regarding difficulty with everyday activities, such as dressing oneself, along with how often volunteers had visited a doctor over the previous two years and what chronic conditions, such as high blood pressure or diabetes, they had.

According to results published in The Gerentologist, the team found that dog walking “is associated with better health and health behaviors” as well as fewer doctor visits, lower BMIs and a greater capacity for daily activities. The team also noted, “People who had a greater attachment with their dog were more likely to walk their dog and to walk their dogs for more minutes.”

 

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Less Body Fat for

Tots Taking Vitamin D

 


Young children who were given vitamin D developed more lean mass and less body fat, according to a McGill University study.

Researchers looked at results of a trial in which children in their first year of life were given vitamin D supplements. They were looking for signs that the extra D would help build bone strength, which it did.

However, the body scans they did to assess bone density produced an unexpected result: Children with optimal D intakes showed less body fat and more lean mass by age three, according to results published in Pediatric Obesity.

“We were very intrigued by the higher lean mass,” said McGill’s Hope Weiler, PhD, a study co-author.

 

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Health Calendar

 

 

Men’s Health Month

The Idea: To focus attention on male wellness concerns,
including prostate health and other issues;
includes Men’s Health Week, June 13-19

Sponsored by: Men’s Health Network

Contact: menshealthmonth.org

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